Water for Food

sustainability

Water and Natural Resources Tour explores Republican River Basin

July 16, 2015

Photo by Richael Young

This summer’s Water and Natural Resources Tour included nearly 70 participants, from college students to retired farmers, and most with a firm background in water quality and quantity issues – except for me. As a 19-year-old undergrad student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), I set out with a vague awareness of the water issues facing Nebraska and neighboring state irrigators, but nothing to the extent that was presented on tour. Read More

Perspectives on Achieving a Water and Food Secure Future

April 29, 2015

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At the 7th World Water Forum in South Korea, many of the world’s top researchers and leaders in the water and food sectors gathered to share ideas and progress toward ensuring a water and secure future. With an expected population growth of 10 billion by 2050, our food production will need to nearly double to meet global demands. Read More

Partnerships pave the way to innovative solutions for water and food security

April 23, 2015

stream sampling (2)

We need a bigger table. There will be over 200,000 more people at the global dinner table tonight than were there last night. By 2050, there will be nearly 10 billion people to feed on this planet. But our population is not only growing, it’s growing wealthier, with increasing demand for food — especially meat and dairy products, requiring more agricultural production and water use. As a result of population increases and rising incomes, total food demand will likely double by 2050 (Earth Policy Institute, 2014). Read More

World Water Day 2015 – Managing our Water Future: Innovation for Water and Sustainable Development

March 22, 2015

WWD

Water is arguably our most precious natural resource, and particularly vulnerable to the impact of climate change, as well as to the increasing demand for food as our global population grows to 9.6 billion by 2050. Economies and incomes are growing, fueling a revolution in global agriculture that will likely result in nearly a doubling of demand for food, feed, fiber and fuel in the next 35 years.

Currently 70 percent of extracted freshwater worldwide is used for agriculture production. In the absence of progress, water use for agriculture is estimated to grow to 89 percent by 2050,[1] which is clearly untenable given other critical water demands. We must take action to improve how we use, conserve and manage our water supply so that future generations have the opportunity to access sufficient and sustainable sources of food and agriculture products. Read More

World Water Day – info and resources

World Water Day has been observed on 22 March since 1993 when the United Nations General Assembly declared 22 March as “World Day for Water”.Read More

The High Plains Aquifer: Not an Underground Lake

January 16, 2015

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The United States Geological Survey (USGS) released a report on the status of the High Plains Aquifer, the largest aquifer in North America and the aquifer that underlies eight states and supplies one-third of the groundwater pumped annually within the United States.

The report highlights that there are some locations in which the High Plains Aquifer has been severely depleted, with the water table dropping more than 150 feet in parts of Kansas and Texas. In other locations, the water levels have remained fairly stable, as is the case in Nebraska. Read More

Water for Food Faculty Fellows – Agriculture

May 23, 2014

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What happens in Neb., stays in Neb… and other things you didn’t know about the Ogallala Aquifer

April 29, 2014

James Goeke holds sediment material at a High Plains Aquifer drill site in western Neb. Credit: University of Nebraska-Lincoln

For one thing, the aquifer that most think of — one of the world’s largest that underlies parts of eight U.S. states — is technically not the Ogallala Aquifer, but the High Plains Aquifer.

“That’s been a source of confusion,” said hydrogeologist Jim Goeke, professor emeritus at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. “We use the names interchangeably, but they’re not the same. We have other productive aquifers in Nebraska in hydraulic connection that encompass the entire High Plains Aquifer.”

But the name aside, what bothers Goeke more is the common misinformation he encounters about aquifers, especially the High Plains. Read More

Celebrating World Water Day: Thinking Broadly, Acting Specifically

March 21, 2014

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At World Water Week in Stockholm last September, I participated in a session designed to foster a dialog between senior and young professionals. I was, needless to say, in the “senior” category. We’d been tasked with discussing the water/food/energy “Nexus Approach” and were given a set of questions in advance. The lively conversation raised many interesting points. It also exposed a fundamental difference in thinking that helps illuminate a debate I’ve seen intensifying in development circles.

As World Water Day and its water and energy theme are celebrated around the world tomorrow, it is timely to reflect on ways to approach nexuses in ways that are practical and expansive, rather than restrictive. Read More

New collaboration to help build resilience in agroecosystems

February 18, 2014

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The concept of resilience, first introduced in the 1970s, has become a hot topic, reaching beyond its ecological roots to other fields, including water and food systems. But resilience researchers and food productivity experts don’t necessarily speak the same language and greater collaboration would benefit future water and food security as well as natural ecosystems, said Craig Allen, University of Nebraska-Lincoln wildlife ecologist and DWFI fellow.

Last week, Allen and other members of the Resilience Alliance, an international, multi-disciplinary network of researchers, met with DWFI’s Christopher Neale in Paris to develop a collaborative large-scale research project that brings a resilience focus to food production. The three-day meeting is a direct result of networking that began at the 2013 Water for Food Conference, which focused on building resilient agroecosystems. Read More

 
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